ETP: Part 6 — The ETP will make the rich even richer

(Also published on The Malaysian Insider)

The ETP will be bad for wage-earners. Workers’ share of national income under the ETP will be just 21 per cent compared to 28 per cent currently. Wage-earners’ losses will be corporate gains. The corporate share of ETP income will be 74 per cent, up from 67 per cent today. We fully support a vibrant corporate sector, but a healthy middle class is also crucial for sustainable high-income status. In developed economies, wages take about 50 per cent of national income.

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ETP: Part 5 — The ETP so far is just a handful of mega-projects

(Also published on The Malaysian Insider)

ETP: Part 5 — The ETP so far is just a handful of mega-projects
Dr. Ong Kian Ming & Teh Chi-Chang

Just two mega-projects and oil, gas and energy, really. Behind the apparently impressive RM176 billion of investments achieved in the ETP so far is a sobering picture. The MRT and Petronas’ RAPID mega-projects make up 55 per cent of total investments in Entry Point Projects (EPPs). Going by National Key Economic Area, 53 per cent of investments were in just one NKEA — Oil, Gas & Energy.

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The Great Debate’s political impact – one week later

(Also published on Malaysiakini

One week after the debate between MCA president Dr Chua Soi Lek and DAP secretary-general and Penang Chief Minister Lim Guan Eng, after the passions have cooled down and the arguments digested, what is the likely political impact, if any, moving forward?

What most Malaysians may not have realised is the one cardinal rule associated with political debates – “Don’t Screw Up”. Most of the members of audience would not remember the substantive points made by politicians on salient issues during these debates but almost all of them would remember if any political gaffes were made.

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